Australian Golf Heritage Society Forum

Welcome to the second incarnation of the Australian Golf Heritage Society forum. All members of the Society are invited to actively participate in the Forum, and to share their experience, knowledge, ideas and wisdom.

As a Guest you are able to read posts, but to contribute you need to register. This is a simple matter of clicking on the 'Register' link, and following your nose. Help is always available if you need it. Please note that this is a forum for the sharing of opinions, ideas and knowledge, and we would ask that you respect everyone's opinions, ideas, and knowledge.

If you disagree with something said, by all means air that disagreement respectfully. If you feel the need to become insulting or abusive, you will quickly feel the need to find another forum. I can do that.

Welcome again - and enjoy.

You are not logged in.

#1 23-06-2016 19:45:53

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Worth starting a new thread for this project.

I have never seen or held a long nose in the flesh, so I thought I would start from scratch like a budding club builder in the early days.  I sketched out what I thought might work, and some comments are:
1. Lie angle about 55 degrees - OK for fairway.
2. Grain angle to base of club 45 degrees.  Thus the grain does not run parallel to either the hosel of the nose.
3. Height of nose about inch and a quarter.  (No metrics then).
4. Length of nose about 4 inches from the intersection of the nose and hosel.
5. Length of hosel about 4 inches from the base - can be cut shorter later if necessary.
6. Hosel about 1 inch to start off with.
7. Have not worried about the depth of the head yet.
8. The above means I will need a slab of whatever timber about 6 1/2 in x 4 in.  Cheated and noticed a mention of "Beech" - might be hard to get.

First_Step.jpg


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

Offline

#2 26-06-2016 12:22:06

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Rob
Looks good
If you search exotic timber supplies you should come across some who have access to European beech.
They supply this type of timber to wood turners.
Alternatively get in touch with a wood turning assoc and they should be able to help
I'm working on replicating some face inserts in resin at the moment.
Will post pictures soon
Cheers
Ross

Offline

#3 26-06-2016 22:15:02

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Rob,

Are you building a long nose replica or a splice neck?

If it's the former, I could get you some measurements and photos of the two that we have in the Museum. If you'd prefer to get up close and personal with them yourself, I'd be happy to clear it with the Museum Collections Manager.

P.S. If it's the latter, I could do exactly the same, but it would be easier. smile


Cheers.


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

Offline

#4 27-06-2016 18:49:08

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Uh Oh.  Now I've started something.  I thought long nose and splice neck would be the same thing?

Also, my chippie son tells me I've got the grain a*** about.  I should have the grain so that it points towards the face.  This would mean the ball is hitting the face like a hammer would hit a wood chisel.  The way I have it drawn, the hammer (ball) would be hitting the side of the chisel handle, and break the nose in half and/or just shatter!  I am learning some things already. 

More homework needed before I start doing anything practical!

Cheers


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

Offline

#5 27-06-2016 21:07:58

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Rob,

From http://www.timewarpgolf.com/index.php?m … =page&id=9

"The picture below shows how the design of wooden headed golf clubs evolved from pre-1800 (like the Troon woods), to the mid-1800s ( the black headed club), to the 1880s (late long nose), to the transitional period (1885-1895), to "bulger" headed woods around 1895...and then to socket headed woods of a shape that would remain largely unchanged throughout most of the 20th century."

Evolutionofgolfclubs.jpg

The four on the left are splice/scare neck with varying degrees of snout length. The Museum objects - from memory - cover all except far left.


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

Offline

#6 28-06-2016 19:04:49

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Aha.  I think I like the look of number 3 (late long nose).  It also looks to be the easiest of the snouts to start on.

(Incidentally boss, I am posting this on Mac which has the attachment problems earlier discussed.  Another thing that now does not work is the "Subscribe" bit.)

Cheers


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

Offline

#7 10-07-2016 10:53:45

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Rob
This is from the Longnose forum and explains the grain conundrum perfectly. Sums up why even though Australia has some of the hardest timbers available their grain structure makes them more susceptible to splitting and not suitable for club making.

"At the risk of getting too pedantic, here are my thoughts on grain direction:
Grain straight across from toe to heel or with a slight U shape is best. But, with fruitwoods, finding a large straight grain slab is not so easy. So, we are usually dealing with curved grain.Two factors for club head durability need to be considered: prevention of crushing the wood fibers and prevention of splitting. My thought on U-shaped grain would be that the apex of the "U" should point toward the lead, not the head. This would have the end grain toward the face. This would be similar to having an end grain butcher block, which holds up better than face grain against hammering. A ball impacting end grain (axial load) will compress/crush the wood less than if it hits the face grain (apex of "U" toward face). On the other hand, splitting of wood along grain lines would be more likely when hitting into the grain, as would happen when we split wood. However, pear and apple, being diffuse porous, rather than ring porous, tend to split much less readily than some other woods along the grain. That is part of the reason we don't use some hard woods, like hickory for the heads. It is a hard wood, but splits easily. We are dealing with compromises.

Jeff Ellis' book, The Clubmaker's Art, shows a variety of grain patterns, but I only saw one club with the grain running diagonally from face back toward the area between the heel and toe.

Here is what J.H. Taylor said in The Book Of Golf And Golfers:

PRACTICAL CLUB-MAKING 263
What I mean is this, the grain of the head should run in one of three ways, either straight across from the face to the lead, longways from the toe to the heel, or curve from the face back towards the heel. With either of these three ways there is not much wrong, but if the grain runs from the face with an inclination towards the toe, the face will generally break up very soon after it is played with. The grain will usually be right if the block is sawn out so that the face of the club shall be formed of that part of the plank which was nearest the heart of the tree. This is also best for durability, as heart-wood, or duramen, is always the strongest. After the blocks are sawn out, they should be stacked in a well ventilated room to season. Plenty of space must be left between."

Cheers
Ross

Offline

#8 10-07-2016 18:53:05

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Lets Get the Long Nose Party Started

Thanks Ross.  Now I really do have indigestion.  I might have bitten off more than I can chew with this one, but I will keep pushing along to see where this goes.  All I have to do is find the right tree...............
Cheers
Rob


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB 1.5.10