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#1 25-04-2016 00:25:21

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Sand tee damage

I have been using a replica sand tee mould for the past couple of years when playing hickory. I have been playing quite regularly for most of this time. Towards the end of last year I gave my woods a bit of a freshen up with 3 coats of polyurethane, they weren't looking too bad but I was refurbishing some other clubs so I did mine as well.

After my most recent round I noticed that the face of my trusty brassie was really starting to wear from using the sand tees. Why all of a sudden was the face of my brassie wearing so quickly? I like to get out early (sunrise) and the last few times I have played the ground has been wet with dew until well into the back nine. Obviously when the wood was moistened and softened the sand had a greater abrasive effect than I have seen in the past. So what, I hear you say!

My question is, if my wood was being damaged by the wet sand playing in Brisbane how did they cope with the same problem in sunny old Scotland? The initial proliferation of face inserts was deemed to be largely due to the introduction of the harder gutty ball when leather was used as a replacement to repair damaged wood faces. However, once rubber core balls arrived on the scene then one would think that the need for inserts would largely disappear. But this was not the case and the large companies like MacGregor and Spalding increased rather than decreased their production of woods with face inserts. Considering wooden tee pegs weren't really popularised until the 1920's was the use of inserts as much about protecting the club face from the abrasive effects of sand than it was about being damaged by the ball?

Any thoughts?
sand_tee_damage.jpg

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#2 25-04-2016 07:43:13

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Sand tee damage

Putting on the hat I saved from Mr. Watkins' Year 11 & 12 Geology class sometime last century, what kind of sand is it? Is it more like coarse river sand, or fine beach sand? Like sandpaper, I'd expect the former to be more abrasive.

Having said that, I have no knowledge of Scotland's littoral geology, and I have seen photos of their beaches covered in rocks rather than sand.

I shared a Book of Face conversation with Ross Baker a while ago about a Dave Young wood. From the photograph I posted, he said it was plain to see that the wood had been 'refaced' (or something similar) many times - screws in the base plate close to the leading edge of the club. Maybe inserts meant that this didn't need to be done so often.

I'll see if I can find the relevant posts.


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#3 25-04-2016 17:32:27

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Sand tee damage

Now that you say it I have a few woods with inserts where you can see the grooves have been re-done. Makes complete sense, keep on re-fishing the face until there's no face left to fix. Unless of course its a club you don't particularly like then obviously there's something wrong with it and it needs to be replaced (i'm sure thats not a modern phenomenon).
The Nudgee sand is of the beach sand variety, I know it intimately

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#4 25-04-2016 18:48:44

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Sand tee damage

My thoughts go more towards the WHEN (how often) and HOW (the shot) the game might have been played, and the consequent longevity of the face.

WHEN: I think the average golfer in the early days would only have played once a week, if that - the days when people had to work for a living, six days a week.  By the time church finished on Sunday, there was probably only time for a few holes.  Also, it seems a lot of games were match play rather than stroke, and maybe players walked off immediately after a result, so not many hits.  For Scotland, the sun probably only shines one or two days a year, so also not much golf.  Only the touring Pro's would have been re-facing a fair bit.

HOW: Maybe early players were able to take the ball very cleanly off the sand tee?  Maybe they weren't concerned about getting height off the tee, but more inclined to go for run/distance, by hitting the ball more towards the top?  Perhaps also, average players were more inclined to use an iron off the tee? - (SFBUM can vouch for that).

(My two cents is probably only worth one cent, if that).


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#5 25-04-2016 21:16:02

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Sand tee damage

Any wonder my forebears emigrated from Scotland to Australia! Work, work and more work, no golf and always raining!
No coincidence I guess that the same country is just as famous for its fine Whisky.

You will appreciate that I have managed to spread the abrasion from impact with the sand tee (no wider than the insert in the face) all the way from toe to heel. Takes a special kind of golfer to do that, one that probably should be using an iron from the tee every now and again.
I take your point about picking the ball from the tee rather than hitting through it. I tee the ball pretty low to begin with and tend to just skim the turf with all of my woods so I would be more prone to the sand damage than most.

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