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#1 01-02-2016 23:10:00

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

Having been mightily impressed by the work done by Ross retrofitting hickory shafts, a comment made re taper on the wood heads made me revisit a club I have in the collection.

It came with some pretty ugly whipping about the hosel, and a rather marked lump in the middle.

Reliance05.jpg

When I took the whipping off, there was a metal collar at the top of the hosel - certainly nothing I've seen before.

Reliance06.jpg

Cutting a long story short, I did a bit of a restoration on the club to get it into playing condition:

Reliance08.jpg

And whipped above and below the collar . . . because I certainly wasn't going to try and remove it.

Reliance10.jpg

Is it possible that this is an old retrofit? I can find no reference to Wright & Ditson Reliance clubs per se, but I can find W & D using the 'Reliance' brand on golf balls, tennis racquets, and badminton shuttlecocks 1935+. It does not have a screw through the back of the club, but I seem to recall early steel shafts being screwed though the soleplate.

Please discuss :-) .

Last edited by SFBUM (04-02-2016 10:28:09)


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#2 03-02-2016 11:25:24

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

Steve
Any evidence of damage or splitting of hosel below collar?
Does the shaft bore through to base of clubhead?

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#3 03-02-2016 13:08:04

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

Ross,

There was no damage at all to the hosel. I thought about it later, and it occurred to me that the collar could perhaps work like the jig you can get for drilling shafts for extensions. I'm only guessing, but it gives a possible purpose for the collar.

The shaft goes through the baseplate.

Reliance02.jpg

The club also has a really deep - and untypical for the era - face.

Reliance15.jpg

Last edited by SFBUM (03-02-2016 14:55:24)


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#4 04-02-2016 23:59:48

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

In my opinion this club has been re-shafted with hickory but was originally a steel shafted club. Considering the style and quality of the work I'd also say it is quite possibly period or at the very least has been carried out by somebody used to working with golf clubs of this era.

My reasons:
1) The distance from the club head to the bottom of the whipping is considerably shorter when compared to a properly whipped steel or hickory shafted club and is characteristic of the lower whipping needed to cover a hickory shaft inserted into a previously steel shafted hosel. When you insert a hickory shaft (11-12mm) into a hosel tapered to suit a steel shaft (7-8mm) you immediately reduce the distance from the clubhead where the shaft and hosel are the same diameter. Looking at Steve's club draw a line following the taper of the hosel back up the hickory shaft to a point 2/3 the thickness of the hickory shaft (8mm vs 12mm). You have now moved the point at which the hosel and shaft are the same diameter much further up the shaft to a point where I think the the whipping would normally be seen, i.e., further up the shaft away from the clubhead.

I think the hosel was cut off at the point where the 2 diameters were approximately the same and the metal ring was inserted to "finish" off the join and possibly to add some extra strength.

2) It is extremely common to see aluminium base plates drilled through in steel shafted clubs as they needed a pin or screw inserted through the end of the shaft into the clubhead. Usually in hickory shafted clubs the shaft is finished below the base plate as there is no need to protrude through the plate. This gives the club a much more attractive finish and is easier to do. Why bore through the base plate if you didn't need to?

3) I think the combination of the deep face design, aluminium plate, cross-hatched face pattern and missing shaft screw place this club somewhere in the late 1930's early 1940's when the screws through the steel shaft into the hosel were becoming much smaller and in many cases were not used at all (as in this case). MacGregor and Wilson both released new deep faced driver models in 1940. Hillerich & Bradsby released a deep faced "bulldog" style driver in 1939 and followed in 1940 with several other deep face models.

In agree with Steve and suggest that the size, shape and deep face of this club are "untypical" for the hickory period and would suggest it has been a steel shafted club re-shafted with hickory.

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#5 05-02-2016 09:41:06

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

Ross,

Thanks for that! It makes sense when you think it through.

Given the distressed state of the club when I got it - and the rest of the clubs it came with - I tend to think that the 'installation' is of considerable age.

That is also exactly what this forum should be about . . . a chance remark in an email, an unusual club, a question, and a well thought out and cogent response which may prompt further discussion and sharing of knowledge. If only we could get more member buy-in.

I'll give it another plug when I send out the next eBulletin.


Cheers.

Last edited by SFBUM (05-02-2016 09:45:39)


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#6 15-02-2016 16:48:46

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Retrofitting Hickory Shafts

In my case, I broke the shaft in my Baffy, and found the hosel very weak and thin, and carrying a terminal crack down its back.  While fitting a new shaft, I first slid a collar (piece of tube) over the hosel, fitted the shaft and screwed the collar to the shaft.  The club has been used many times with a full swing, and (touch hickory) should outlast me.
DSCN9917.jpg


DSCN9918.jpg


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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