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#1 27-02-2016 18:04:32

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Wooden Club Heads

I have noticed that some of the restored wooden club heads proudly - and rightfully so - displayed hereabouts have very pronounced head stamping, i.e. the name of the club, model, and/or maker are shown in very distinct gold lettering.

Does anyone have a method for making this so that they are prepared to share?


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#2 28-02-2016 19:50:25

Pipdog
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Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Wooden Club Heads

I don't have a method for gold painting, but I have sat for hours (if not days) with a stanley blade and a scriber, scraping out and deepening lettering in wood tops.


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#3 02-03-2016 18:58:42

Auchterlonie
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Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Wooden Club Heads

Rob
RE:Gold painting
A method to deepen the engraving to make the stamp more distinct (as per Steve) or a method to paint the stamping thats already there?
Can't help you with the engraving but for painting the existing stamp I use a metallic gold "gel" ball point pen, my girls use these a lot for colouring in which is where I stumbled across them. This is what I do when re-finishing wood clubs for play (NOT COLLECTABLES). I find the nib is fine enough to get into the stamp and even when the stamp is quite worn it will still follow the engraving in the wood head. After filling in the engraving with the gold pen and allowing it to dry thoroughly I then simply use very fine wet and dry to lightly sand over the stamp. The gold within the engraving stays and the rest is sanded away. Obviously you can only use this method if you are re-finishing the entire surface of the club (as I do for my playclubs). You may be able to, with a steady hand, use the gel pen on collectable clubs to enhance the stamping if it is deep enough and (rather than sand away the excess after it has dried) quickly wipe away the gold pen outside of the engraving with a cloth. Art shops have good quality metallic pens

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#4 02-03-2016 19:01:44

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Wooden Club Heads

Correction
Steve where it says Rob and Rob where it says Steve!
Its been a long day

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#5 07-03-2016 20:27:25

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Wooden Club Heads

Thanks for the tip! It's amazing how so many of these things are hiding in plain sight.

And this was only ever for play clubs. :-)


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#6 26-04-2016 21:24:48

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Wooden Club Heads

More on wooden club heads . . .

Has anyone restored the stripe on the top of a wood? Or created a stripe where one didn't previously exist?


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#7 29-04-2016 11:00:26

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Wooden Club Heads

No.1
The best quality masking tape you can buy
The blue coloured stuff is the best I've used and its absolutely necessary to stop the bleeding of colour. I've been using a 19mm 3M blue masking tape but you can get different widths depending on how you need/want to do it.
After experimenting quite a bit, these days I try and take the wood head right back to bare timber if I can. I find this gives me the most consistent finish when it comes to colouring and application of polyurethane finish. I only ever use water based markers (ala Bob Kuntz's excellent book on club restoration) to colour the wood heads. You can get good quality art markers from art shops or you can do what I do and use simple Faber-Castell kids connector markers. I used to buy the sets and take all the browns and give the rest to my kids but then I discovered you can buy the individual browns at Officeworks. There are about 7 or 8 in the range and if you buy more than 5 you get a bulk discount. They work out to be about 80c - $1.00 per pen. Using them to finish the wood is a topic in itself.

So, if I'm doing a light stripe then once I have prepared the head (paint stripping, sanding etc) ready for colour (including the gold lettering if any) I will mask off area I want to stripe and then colour the entire head in the darker colour (usually brown or black). I take particular care to really rub the tape down firmly onto the surface to prevent any bleeding under the tape. For the light stripes Ive just been using the 19mm tape as the width of the stripe. Colour right up to and over the edge of the tape so that you will have a nice sharp line when finished.

Once the colouring is finished and dry then you can remove the tape and you will have a 19mm bare timber stripe in the middle of a dark water coloured wood head. From there I simple colour the stripe with whatever lighter colour I want being careful to go right to the edge of the darker colour. Because its light over dark you can go just over the edge of the mask onto the dried dark colour and that way you will get that nice crisp line.

If Im doing a dark stripe on a light coloured wood head then its much the same process except that for the dark stripe I now use 2 pieces of tape to mask the stripe area and I colour the light main head colour before applying and masking tape. I put a single piece in the area I want to mask and then tape up to either edge so I get a nice uniform width stripe then I remove the middle piece of tape and leave the 2 outer pieces. With a dark stripe the 2 outer edges of the single piece of tape defines the stripe. With a light stripe the 2 inner edges of the 2 pieces of tape now define the stripe. The only difference being that you need to make sure that the lighter main head colour goes beyond the edge of the masked area so that when you colour over with the darker stripe colour you will be left with a crisp line between the 2 colours.

As I mentioned earlier the colouring process is the most difficult and the key to how your wood will look when finished.

wood_1_stripe.jpg

wood_2_stripe.jpg

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