Australian Golf Heritage Society Forum

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#1 19-10-2015 19:18:48

Pipdog
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Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Molasses

Still using a solution of 1 part molasses to 8 parts water to remove rust from heads.  Remove shaft, put head in solution.  Take out every couple of days and use brass wire brush to loosen up.  One currently in the bath is a Maxwell Mashie sold by Dodge bros in Sydney.  It has been in the bath for about 8 days, and is almost complete.


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#2 19-10-2015 19:55:06

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Molasses

I knew you'd be back :-).


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#3 19-10-2015 21:41:23

Auchterlonie
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Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Molasses

Hey Rob (and Steve)
The forum is back!! Awesome!
Is the molasses mixture for restoration of heritage/collectable clubs?
Do you use a different method for clubs that are for play only?
Do you treat the restored irons with anything to prevent rust?
Cheers
Ross

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#4 19-10-2015 22:16:43

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Molasses

Ross,

I've only ever used the molasses method for collectibles, and then selectively. For play clubs I've found the brass brush by itself most acceptable.

I've tried a couple of 'rust preventatives'. Spray on fish oil is okay for play clubs, but I use Cabinet Makers Wax for the good stuff.


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#5 21-10-2015 16:44:41

Pipdog
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Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Molasses

Hi Auchter
I use the molasses for all clubs that need rust removal.  I don't think it removes metal, and doesn't seem to leave any pitting - must look on the Net and see if there is a chemical explanation.  I spray club heads with clear coat metal spray - for play clubs I use spray initially, but then use Inox after each round.  When they become tatty, I brass-wire brush the clear coat off and do them again.  All my stored clubs are clear coated - no need to keep checking them - we live 40 metres from salt water.
Looking forward to Qld Champs.
Cheers


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#6 21-10-2015 20:00:08

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Molasses

Steve and Rob
I've never tried the molasses but will be keen to give it a go. Not being a collector of Australian clubs I only really have 4-5 irons that I consider as collectors items and they are in pretty good condition anyway so I've never tried restoration of irons to any great extent.

For play clubs I'm a bit more gung ho and don't mind taking to them with a 120 grit emery wheel (for bad rust) and wire wheel to get rid of rust and/or peeling chrome. Norm put me onto the "inox lanox" recently, it certainly looks to do the trick. As its made in Brisbane I was hoping to get hold of a 5L bottle and soak some iron heads in it. The only thing I am worried about soaking the heads is the lanox getting into the hosel which might interfere with the epoxy taking hold when I re-shaft them.
I also have a clear metal lacquer but haven't tried it out yet. I was thinking for my play cubs maybe just spray the backs and use the lanox on the face if and when needed.

What do you guys do to look after the shafts of your play clubs?
I've read some that say to use a little bit of linseed oil and others who warn against it. I give mine a rub with super fine wet and dry or steel wool and then wipe on a coat or two of shellac if they are looking a bit ordinary. I rarely if ever play with my hickories in the wet so they don't have to withstand the ravages of the weather as they probably did way back when.
Cheers
Ross

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#7 22-10-2015 15:52:04

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Molasses

I don't use oil on my shafts.  I sand them back, and apply a dye (rather than a stain) to the colour I like, and then spray with clear polyurethane.

Incidentally, to straighten shafts, I put the butt end in the vyce, and use a 1600 watt "heat and strip" gun, heating the "short" side of the shaft until it becomes "elastic", keeping some weight on the shaft to go a little past straight.  Remove the heat, and as the shaft cools, check/recheck straightness, and push and shove until it cools to straight.
Some would say I am drying out the shaft with the heat.  I think any piece of wood that is 100 years old has lost all its sap, and can't be dried any further.  I have not broken a heat-straightened shaft, and so far they have maintained their straightness - more than a year since I did the first one.  I am not sure about oiling shafts.  I don't think the wood absorbs the oil, but perhaps the oil allows the molecules to slip a bit rather than fracture?????


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#8 22-10-2015 22:25:56

SFBUM
Putter
From: Chipping Norton NSW
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 51
Website

Re: Molasses

I originally rubbed back shafts to bare timber with steel wool, and then shellaced a couple of times. If they were play clubs, I'd give them a bit of a rub with linseed oil about a week before they were used.

Now, I rub back the shafts to bare timber with steel wool, and then treat them with a linseed oil/gum turpentine mixture that I cook up myself. It stinks a bit when you are making it, but smells great when you are using it. I was originally put onto this by Barry Leithhead, and the mantra goes something like once a day for a week, once a week for a month, once a month for a year, and once a year for the rest of your life. A little bit goes a long way, and I'll try and find the 'recipe' again.

I straighten shafts using a heat gun, and a variation on the jig described at:

http://www.hickorygolfworkshop.com/-tools.html

Mine is a little simpler, and a little more adaptable. I also use a bit of linseed when heating the timber, but you have to be careful not to get too enthusiastic with the heat gun. None of the shafts that I've straightened have unstraightened, and - touch wood - none of them have broken.

It's interesting that we use different methods to arrive at the same result.


Gone golfing - be back at dark thirty.

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#9 26-10-2015 18:55:21

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Molasses

Hello Rob
Great day on Friday! RQ is a great course for hickory play especially when the wind gets up.
Have several clubs soaking in the molasses bath. Did a bit of reading and it appears as if its the chelating agents in the molasses (specifically aspartic, glutamic, citric and malic acids) and a few other goodies (copper, glucose etc.) that do the trick.
Not much good for peeling chrome though so I will stick to my current method for dealing with that, play clubs only of course! (see below)
Cheers
Ross

nicoll_putter_3.jpg

nicoll_putter_4.jpg

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#10 05-11-2015 16:10:36

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Molasses

(Haven't I got something better to do?)

This Mashie had years of baked on rust - not the flakey kind.  3 weeks in the Molasses, and a clean up, and it should be a good player (Forgan Maxwell).

Rusty_Mashie_1.jpg

Rusty_Mashie_2.jpg

Rusty_Mashie_3.jpg


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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#11 21-11-2015 19:00:24

Auchterlonie
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 37

Re: Molasses

Rob
I'm sold on the molasses
Have been taking heads off shafts and soaking them in stages.
The first lot were in for about 3 weeks. Most came out pretty good a couple needed a bit more time. As they come out I throw a few more in and sit back and forget (literally)! I've been quite busy lately so being able to soak them and come back later when I get a chance is working out perfectly.
See photo of 3rd stage (and final) stage of refurbished "peeling chrome" iron. After removing the chrome with the emery wheel the iron needs to be finished with fine wet and dry to get the original smooth look again. Doesn't take too long and worth the effort (I think) in the end.
nicoll_irons.jpg

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#12 23-11-2015 17:07:15

Pipdog
Putter
Registered: 19-10-2015
Posts: 54

Re: Molasses

Good.  Found the simple "chemics".

"......... Removing rust using Molasses uses a process known as Chelating. Without a good, scientific explanation, the process can be described as "Reverse Oxidation", wherein certain acids or chemicals in the molasses solution strip the oxygen from the Iron Oxide, leaving the iron behind..........."


Have a few clubs, mostly junk, but all playable.

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